What Should I Do After A Tooth Extraction?

How can I make my tooth extraction heal faster?

How to recover from oral surgeryTake it easy.

Rest at home, avoiding physical activity.

Use ice.

Apply ice packs to your face for 15 minutes on and then 15 minutes off to keep swelling down.Eat soft foods.

Take prescribed antibiotics.

Keep your mouth clean.

Brush carefully.

Eat foods rich in vitamin A and C..

How long do you have to wait to eat after getting a tooth pulled?

For at least 24 hours after your tooth extraction, you should consume only soft foods and liquids. You can ease into a more normal diet when you feel comfortable doing so. Try to stick with easy-to-chew foods for a few days. Initially, choose cool foods like yogurt, pudding, Jell-O, and ice cream.

How many days does it take for a tooth extraction to heal?

Typically, your oral surgeon will ask that you at least take about 48-72 hours to relax afterward so the treatment area is allowed to clot. After that, a patient should be able to return to normal physical activity. The soft tissue will usually fully heal in about 3-4 weeks.

How do you know when your tooth extraction is healed?

When to see a dentist. It’s normal to have some discomfort, swelling, and bleeding after getting a tooth pulled. If you don’t have any complications, your socket will likely heal within 10 days after the procedure. If you think you may have an infection or dry socket, you should call your dentist right away.

Do I need antibiotics after tooth extraction?

Infection. Every patient has oral bacteria that could cause an infection if it enters their bloodstream. For most healthy patients, their immune system protects them from such an occurrence and antibiotics are only prescribed after dental surgery if an infection occurs as a complication.

How do you sleep after a tooth extraction?

Following any type of oral surgery, including a tooth extraction, you should sleep elevated for the first 2-3 nights. This allows your body to drain more of the fluid away from the extraction site. If you were to lie flat on your back, the amount of swelling is much more likely to increase.

Is it normal for surrounding teeth to hurt after an extraction?

Normally after tooth extraction, you may experience tenderness for few days, slight bleeding, mild swelling, wound healing in a week or two, and finally tissues and bone filling in the next few months. However, sometimes tooth extraction procedures might go wrong and the surrounding teeth and gum may end up affected.

Do and don’ts after tooth extraction?

To avoid dislodging the blood clot, don’t rinse, spit, or use a straw for 24 hours after the procedure. After 24 hours, rinse your mouth with a salt solution, made with half a teaspoon of salt and 8 ounces warm water. Avoid smoking. When sleeping, prop your head up with pillows, as lying flat can prolong healing.

How long does pain last after tooth extraction?

Having pain after your surgery is expected and common. Pain may last up to two weeks after surgery. It is highly recommended to take two Advil or Motrin immediately when you get home. Keep the narcotic pain medications for bedtime.

What not to do when you get a tooth pulled?

Avoid rinsing or spitting forcefully for 24 hours after the extraction to avoid dislodging the clot that forms in the socket. After 24 hours, rinse with your mouth with a solution made of 1/2 teaspoon salt and 8 ounces of warm water. Do not drink from a straw for the first 24 hours.

When can I brush my teeth with toothpaste after an extraction?

Do not directly brush the extraction site for the first 3-4 days after surgery to prevent dislodging of the blood clot from the socket. Don’t use any toothpaste. Rinsing toothpaste from your mouth could remove the blood clot. Instead this area can be gently and carefully wiped with a clean, wet gauze pad or cloth.

How do I know if I have dry socket or normal pain?

You probably experience a dry socket if you can look into your open mouth in a mirror and see the bone where your tooth was before. The explicit throbbing pain in your jaw represents another telltale signal of dry sockets. The pain may reach your ear, eye, temple or neck from the extraction site.