Question: What Is The Treatment Of Rheumatic Heart Disease?

What is the cause of rheumatic heart disease?

Rheumatic heart disease is a condition in which permanent damage to heart valves is caused by rheumatic fever.

The heart valve is damaged by a disease process that generally begins with a strep throat caused by bacteria called Streptococcus, and may eventually cause rheumatic fever..

Can rheumatic heart disease be inherited?

It is not clear why some people who are infected with group A Streptococcus bacteria go on to develop rheumatic fever, while others do not; however, it appears that some families may have a genetic susceptibility to develop the condition.

How do you prevent a heart infection?

Fortunately, there are many things you can do to reduce your chances of getting heart disease:Control your blood pressure. … Keep your cholesterol and triglyceride levels under control. … Stay at a healthy weight. … Eat a healthy diet. … Get regular exercise. … Limit alcohol. … Don’t smoke. … Manage stress.More items…

Can you be cured of heart disease?

A: Although we can’t cure heart disease, we can make it better. Most forms of heart disease are very treatable today. There is some evidence that normalizing high blood pressure and lowering cholesterol to very low levels will partially reverse plaques in the coronary arteries.

What age does heart disease start?

Your risk for heart disease increases with age, especially with people of color and for those who are over 65. While the average age for a heart attack is 64.5 for men, and 70.3 for women, nearly 20 percent of those who die of heart disease are under the age of 65.

How is rheumatic heart disease prevented?

Ideally, ARF and RHD can be prevented. Antibiotic therapy (such as penicillin) to treat Group A Streptococcus throat infection can dramatically reduce the risk of ARF and its complication, rheumatic heart disease. If ARF or RHD do occur, long-term antibiotics can reduce progression to more severe disease.

How long is the treatment for rheumatic fever?

Preventive treatment will likely continue through age 21 or until your child completes a minimum five-year course of treatment, whichever is longer. People who have had heart inflammation during rheumatic fever might be advised to continue preventive antibiotic treatment for 10 years or longer.

How do you know if you have rheumatic heart disease?

The symptoms of heart valve problems – which are often the result of rheumatic heart disease – can include: chest discomfort or pain. irregular or rapid heartbeats (heart palpitations) shortness of breath.

What antibiotics treat rheumatic fever?

The mainstay antibiotic is IM benzathine benzylpenicillin. Oral phenoxymethylpenicillin and erythromycin are also used as alternatives. These three antibiotics, in the required dosage forms are on the current EMLc. No additional antibiotic agents have been identified to date.

Is RHD preventable?

ARF and RHD are preventable diseases RHD is a preventable and treatable disease. It is common in low- and middle-income countries (Wyber 2014, Webb, 2015), and only in socioeconomically disadvantaged populations in high-income countries.

Which valve is most commonly affected by rheumatic heart disease?

Rheumatic heart disease most commonly affects the mitral valve (which has only two leaflets; Figure 2) or the aortic valve, but any valve can be affected, and more than one can be involved.

How long can you live with rheumatic heart disease?

The relative survival was 96.9% (95% CI 96.1–97.5%) at one year and 81.2% (95% CI 79.2–83.0%) at five years (S3 Fig). The risk of death among RHD/ARF patients increased with age over and above background rates; there was also increased risk for both male and iTaukei patients (S4 Table).

Is rheumatic heart disease permanent?

Rheumatic heart disease is a condition that causes permanent damage to the heart valves. It can develop after a child has rheumatic fever.

Does rheumatic fever ever go away?

Inflammation caused by rheumatic fever can last a few weeks to several months. In some cases, the inflammation causes long-term complications. Rheumatic fever can cause permanent damage to the heart (rheumatic heart disease).

Can you live a long life with heart disease?

Simply put, if you take care of yourself and make the necessary changes, you can live a long, full life in spite of your heart disease diagnosis. It could add years, even decades, to your life. On the other hand, if you pursue a high-risk lifestyle you could find yourself in serious trouble.

What are the complications of rheumatic heart disease?

Some complications of rheumatic heart disease include:Heart failure. This can occur from either a severely narrowed or leaking heart valve.Bacterial endocarditis. This is an infection of the inner lining of the heart. … Complications of pregnancy and delivery due to heart damage. … Ruptured heart valve.

Is rheumatic heart disease genetic?

RHD is estimated to affect 33.4 million people and results in 10.5 million disability-adjusted life-years lost globally. The disease has long been considered heritable but still little is known about the host genetic factors that increase or reduce the risk of developing RHD.

What are the 4 stages of heart failure?

There are four stages of heart failure (Stage A, B, C and D). The stages range from “high risk of developing heart failure” to “advanced heart failure,” and provide treatment plans.

Is rheumatic heart disease serious?

Some complications of rheumatic heart disease include: Heart failure. This can occur from either a severely narrowed or leaking heart valve. Bacterial endocarditis.

Are bananas bad for heart patients?

Eating bananas every day could help prevent heart attacks and strokes, new research reveals. High in potassium, foods like bananas can stop fatal blockages from occurring and inhibit the hardening and narrowing of arteries.

What is the most common complication of rheumatic fever?

Complications were found in 49% (152/309) of the newly diagnosed RHD cases. Heart failure (46.9%) was the commonest complication, followed by pulmonary hypertension (32.7%), atrial fibrillation (13.9%), acute recurrence of rheumatic fever (11.4%), infective endocarditis (4.5%) and stroke (1.3%).